Arendalsuka 2024: New biotechnology to end malaria: a priority for Norwegian aid?

14. august 2024

Sted: Impact Hub Agder Arendal – Arendal

Tidspunkt: 10:00 - 11:00

Mosquito control programs using genetically modified mosquitoes and more efficient malaria vaccines signal a promising trajectory to end malaria. How should these new malaria measures be prioritized? Who should decide – and pay?

The malaria parasite is a significant global threat, with an annual toll of 250 million falling ill and 600,000 dying from the mosquito-borne disease. Djibouti and Uganda are about to initiate mosquito control programs using genetically modified mosquitoes. Additionally, new malaria vaccines being rolled-out in several African countries, including Cameroon and Burkina Faso.

These biotech advancements signal a promising trajectory for global health, with some foreseeing the potential eradication of malaria. However, biotechnology breakthroughs bring new ethical challenges.

Bioteknologirådet (the Norwegian Biotechnology Advisory Board) and Bergen Centre for Ethics and Priority Setting in Health (BCEPS), University of Bergen, invite national and international experts to deliberate Norway’s role as a global health actor. Is this Norway’s opportunity to lead the charge in malaria eradication, or is Norwegian aid funding best allocated elsewhere?

 

Speakers:

Marianne Aasen, Head of Norwegian Biotechnology Advisory Board

Ole Frithjof Norheim, Professor and Director of Bergen Centre for Ethics and Priority Setting in Health, University of Bergen

Bjørg Sandkjær, State Secretary for Minister of International Development, Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Eirik Mofoss, Executive Director, Langsikt – Centre for Long-Term Policy

Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Special Advisor to the Director General, WHO; Professor and Vice Provost for Global Initiatives, University of Pennsylvania; Workstream Lead, Bergen Centre for Ethics and Priority Setting in Health, University of Bergen

Pakwanja D. Twea, PhD Research Fellow, Bergen Centre for Ethics and Priority Setting in Health, University of Bergen

Lumbwe Chola, Associate Professor at University of Oslo and Ghana NCD Project Lead Bergen Centre for Ethics and Priority Setting in Health, University of Bergen

Eirik Joakim Tranvåg, Senior Advisor at Norwegian Biotechnology Advisory Board

Mette Risa, Head of Communications at Norwegian Biotechnology Advisory Board

 

Register here to attend.

Photo: Lusitana, 4, and her mother Gilimbeta in rural Lilongwe, Malawi. When she was 5 months old, Lusitana was the first child to receive the world’s first malaria vaccine (RTS,S/AS01 or RTS,S) as part of the WHO-coordinated Malaria Vaccine Implementation Programme. Credit: WHO / Fanjan Combrink